Seat Belt Violation Leads To DUI and Drug Arrests

Tuesday, June 12, 2018- 9:24 a.m. 

AM 1180

A stop for a seat belt violation led to a DUI arrest for a Summerville woman and a drug arrest for a Trion man.

According to reports from the Chattooga County Sheriff’s Office, a deputy stopped a driver on Highland Avenue this past Saturday night when he saw the driver was not wearing a seatbelt.  As the deputy approached the truck, he noticed the smell of alcohol.
 
Twenty-four-year-old Brooke England of Summerville was arrested and charged with driving under the influence of alcohol and violation of the open container law.
 
A passenger in the truck, twenty-seven-year-old Zachary Hamby of Trion was arrested after the deputy found five drug needles in his pockets.  Hamby was charged with obstruction of an officer, after telling the deputy that there was nothing in his pockets that would “stick, poke or cut” the deputy.  He was additionally charged with possession of drug-related objects.
 
According to Chattooga County Sheriff Mark Schrader, the accident was between a Chevrolet Silverado and a tractor-trailer.
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